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Sunday, March 31, 2013

Be on the look @TheRealTBOZ will be on the cover of @X10magazine

Be on the look out April 27th for the 3rd issue of Xs10magazine ( @x10magazine ) will be featuring @TheRealTBOZ on the cover. I can not Waite too see the magazine too see what all the fuss is about this young lady..So mark your calendar April 27th @X10magazine & @TheRealTBOZ can Waite too see this ...@x10magazine April 27th I will get
My copy ASAP. Leave a comment and we will tweet your copy a day early..

Friday, March 29, 2013

Career Advice Effectively Utilize Your Youtube Music Videos

If your band is not already on Youtube, you need to stop reading this and go create an account. For everybody else that already has an account, hopefully you’ve been utilizing it to its maximum effectiveness. If not, read on for some easy and helpful tips to improve your Youtube page.

First of all, you should make sure your Youtube Channel is looking the best that it can. Upload all of your band’s music videos and tweak your channel’s appearance so that it fits with the vibe of your band. If you don’t have music videos, you should upload any videos that involve your band. Try and get some friends to take videos of your live shows, or maybe take some behind the scenes videos while your band is in the recording studio. The key is to give your fans an inside look into what the members of the band are like off stage. Even if you already have music videos, behind the scenes videos are a great addition to your video collection.

Make sure to properly tag your videos! Think of as many descriptive keywords as possible and properly tag your videos. It’s also important to have a good thumbnail picture of your video to encourage users to check out your videos.

Share your videos! Make sure you post them to your Facebook and Twitter pages. It’s also a good idea to go through some of your favorite band’s videos and like them as well as subscribe to their channel. This will help give your fans a better idea of what kind of music you are in to. You should also be checking out local bands and liking their videos. A great way to grow your fanbase is to play with similar local bands whose fans would be into your music.

Make yourself accessible! You should always try to include your band’s website and contact information in the video description or the video itself. Make sure it’s clear and easy to read.

Get paid for your music! If you have a cdbaby account, you can easily imbed a music store onto your Youtube Channel. That way, when your fans go to check out your new music video, they can have the option to easily purchase the song right from your Youtube page.

Bitcoin: How An Unregulated, Decentralized Virtual Currency Just Became A Billion Dollar Market

Hang around in the tech industry long enough and you or someone you know will be heard saying, “that’s so crazy it just might work.” Two years ago, if you’d have told me that an open-source, P2P currency would soon be a thriving, billion-dollar market, I would’ve told you that you were on a lonely bus headed to CrazyTown, U.S.A. But today, Bitcoin officially became a crazy idea that’s actually working.
Today, all the Bitcoin in circulation — some 10.9 million of them — have collectively crossed the billion-dollar mark. As it is wont to do, the value of Bitcoin (and its exchange rate) has fluctuated wildly today. At one point, it hit a dollar value around $78, then pushed into the mid-nineties. As of this minute, it’s hovering around $90.
Okay, it’s still a tiny fraction of Google’s market cap, but this is something — especially for a largely unregulated, decentralized virtual currency. (Say that three times fast.) The world’s most popular controversial crypto-currency, mind you.
Bitcoin supporters will scoff and tell you that this is no news, and that Bitcoin has been alive and thriving for years. In fact, it first appeared back in 2009, and has been slowly gaining steam since. But Bitcoin has largely remained outside the realm of mainstream media attention, because no one has been quite sure what to make of it. Is it a passing fad, a hilarious geek-driven phenomenon, or the real deal?
In fact, it has really been relegated to the realm of the uber geeky, or seen as the currency of anarchists or crazy digital libertarians. The black market marketplace known as Silk Road, which allows pretty much anyone to anonymously sell “alternative products” (i.e. large quantities of one’s drug of choice), uses Bitcoin for its currency. Something which hasn’t exactly helped Bitcoin’s “cross over” appeal.
And geeks have had a point: Eventually, with the increasing popularity of P2P networks, virtual currency and digital marketplaces, it was only a matter of time before these entities would collide and a virtual currency of record would emerge. No government control?! Even better!
Bitcoin crossing the $1 billion threshold may not seem like much, but if anything, it seems to be a sign to anyone listening that the crypto-currency is ready to be taken seriously. Of course, there are still a lot of concerns, as John Biggs laid out in 2011.
But why has Bitcoin become a billion-dollar market?
First off, startups are beginning to carry the torch. As Alex wrote yesterday, Expensify announced that it is now supporting Bitcoin “to give international contractors an alternative to PayPal and the high fees associated with the service.” Reddit has jumped on the bandwagon, too, along with WordPress and Namecheap, among others.

Adam Draper, the founder of Menlo Park-based accelerator, Boost VC, recently announced that the team would be focusing on Bitcoin-focused startups for its summer class. As he laid out in a post today, one of the other big reasons Bitcoin is beginning to take off — besides, of course, that it allows secure digital transactions without transmitting personal information — is that investor confidence is growing. Bitcoin startups are beginning to raise, and Draper claims that their fund is far from being the only one that’s interested.
What’s more, the government has finally realized that it needs to start taking virtual currency seriously and develop a strategy for dealing with these types of currencies. FinCEN recently put out a series of “Guidelines,” which will inform future regulation, but also works to establish trust and credibility for virtual currency, particularly Bitcoin.
There’s also the climate of the global financial markets, particularly the panic in Cyprus, after the government froze its citizens’ bank accounts following its bailout. Many believe that the tenuous financial markets in Europe and beyond create an atmosphere that’s ripe for a digital panacea like Bitcoin.
Of course, the other side of the Bitcoin argument is that the confluence of unsteady financial markets, and skyrocketing growth of virtual currency (plus hype), is creating a perfect storm that equates to Bitcoin just being one giant bubble waiting to pop.
What’s more, as my colleague Greg Kumparak pointed out today, Bitcoin itself is still in a tenuous place, policy-wise. There’s a good chance that a decentralized, unregulated market is going to scare the pants off the government once it’s fully cognizant that Bitcoin is a billion-dollar market — and growing. “It’s the easiest ‘this funds terrorism’ scare argument the government will ever try to make, so a big battle within the next year or two is pretty much guaranteed,” he said.
Whether one sees it as a phenomenon or a legitimate institution, Bitcoin is working on all cylinders to become the latter — and now has a real case for our undivided attention. Either way, feel free to marvel at how a virtual currency that appeared practically out of the ether (created by some phantom mathematician/economist) just pulled a billion-dollar market out of its hat.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

5 apps to track your every idea Google isn't the only company trying to dominate note-taking

You're sitting in a café for a few minutes scrolling through the news on your tablet when a few ideas suddenly pop into your head about a project at work. In an earlier era, you'd probably jot the ideas down on a napkin and stuff it in your pocket. Or maybe you'd send a quick email to yourself. Neither option is particularly convenient.

Today, a number of online services are trying to solve the problem of note taking on the fly. They give people using a computer or mobile device a central place to save notes, links and photos. This week, Google joined the already crowded field by introducing Keep, a service that is clearly inspired by its rivals. Google's effort is inevitably a serious one, if only because it has such big name behind it and access to hundreds of millions of existing users.

Given the number of note taking services available, figuring out which one is best can be difficult. They all have strengths and weaknesses based on their features, design and compatibility. The differences between services are in the details.

Can you use your voice to create notes instead of having to go to the trouble of typing them? Is an app available on Android devices? How much data can you upload per month without having to pay? In the end, a note taking service that works for one person may not for another. Here's recap of five note-taking services and what they offer.

NEXT: Evernote

BY VERNE KOPYTOFF

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

FolkLand Hip Hop Nexest sensation Coming Soon

L.O.S. LEMAR FRENCH FOLKLAND

BIO:

"Folkland", the dynamic duo (Lemar French & L.O.S.) hail from the up and coming city of Pittsburgh P.A. Know for their high energy performances and charismatic style of music,
Folkland delivers everytime! "Lemar French", currently employed as the Head Engineer of the recording studio "Ya Momz House LLC",
has for over 9 years perfected his craft working with various acts on a national level.
Some of these acts include: Mac Miller, Young Buck, Lil Scrappy, Rhymefest, Malik Yoba, Carl Clemmons, etc. Known for his attention to detail,
perfectionist is more commonly his I.D. when it comes to music. "L.O.S." artist/writer grew up on the opposite end of the city as his partner Mr. French.
Developing his skill and talent from countless shows and viral video performances L.O.S. has also worked with a sleuth of people on a local and national level.
Together the two form Folkland, named for the abundance of people they've either helped or grew to know throughout their journey in music and consider every contact family.
Feel free to checkout their music and sign up to be a fan and receive exclusive updates/music, etc.

VIDEOS:

MASTERPIECE - http://youtu.be/Ui62z8B9Aok

SO FAR AWAY - http://youtu.be/KIWKG1YjhM

FOOD FOR THOUGHT - http://youtu.be/TiyMU418Pc8

LINKS / INTERVIEWS:

HIPHOP DX - http://www.hiphopdx.com/index/videos/id.9409/title.folkland-food-for-thought

DJ BOOTH - http://www.djbooth.net/index/tracks/review/rhymefest-turn-that-sht-up/

SCOOP THE MAG - http://scoopthemagazine.com/2012/01/02/folkland-gilligans-island/

MUSIK JUNKIES - http://www.musikjunkies.com/blog/2012/02/05/download-folkland-ft-jon-quest-wearefolkland-masterpiece/

BRAIN OF BMW - http://www.brainofbmw.com/folklandbarsoffire/

WHITE MEN CAN'T BLOG - http://whitemencant.blogspot.com/2012/02/catch-up-on-folkland.html

ALBUMS / MIXTAPES:

BADLANDS (2013) http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/folkland2

NO FANS JUST CRITICS (2011) http://www.datpiff.com/FOLKLAND-No-Fans-Just-Critics-mixtape.266328.html

Why You Should Care About Your Image

Innovative and successful artists need to capture their audience and time period to be remembered any genre’s hall of fame. Artists often get more recognition and commentary on their style and image even than their music. Audiences are either captivated and copy their musician idol or are fascinated to see what they will come out in next (or both). For artists that have not hit “the big time” it is even more crucial to find an image that stands out and your audience remembers.

Katy Perry and Nicki Minaj both on iTune’s top ten singles right now (as of Feb 21,2012) are flooded through tabloid magazines and blogs to capture what outrageous thing they will wear next. The have mirrored image success from veterans like Madonna whose image is as valuable as her music. Viewers mirror their favorite musicians. Thousands of girls dressed up like Lady Gaga for Halloween decked in leotards, shoulder pads, and jeweled sunglasses, just as millions have put on gloves, bustier tops and piles of jewelry fashioned to be like Madonna.

Time changes and you see masters of image change throughout their albums and years passing, always surprising and captivating their audience. We have seen Gaga in everything from a meat dress to being carried while inside an egg. Even the Beatles seemed to change their look with every new album from suits and matching hairstyles to beards and hippy vests they captured the world with not only their music but also their image.

It is important to be natural and incorporate your style of music. Creating a buzz about your look cannot sustain just by shocking viewers. Madonna has created pop and dance music, and we have seen that reflected in hear early years to even her later albums in leotards and wristbands; it matches her music. There is a necessary balance between being original and being true to your music genre. Find your personal style, stick with what you are comfortable and feels right, because it becomes various obvious to your viewers when you feel awkward. Do not chase after trends or mimic what has already been done, just focus and intensify your look.

As an up and coming artist it is important to develop your look to brand yourself for your online existence for audience attachment. Your image is not just about the clothing you wear, but needs to reflect in everything you do from logos to your social media pictures. Your image is your brand, it is how you are recognized and encrypted into the world’s mind.
Check out out station as well at www.dagrahyndmusic.co

Monday, March 25, 2013

Open Letter To Rick Ross From A Music Industry Vet

Posted by dee dee “Hip-Hop Mama” cocheta
Editor’s Note: Dee dee cocheta is an industry vet that has had a long tenure in music. Her career spans PR & Social Media Professional, digital content producer, blogger and more. She writes an open letter to Rick Ross after a recent song seems to advocate date rape. Rick Ross has not commented. While rape, real or suggested, is horrific and completely objectionable, the views in this open letter are dee dee’s.

Greetings William,

I am writing you a letter because I have sat back and observed long enough. I am coming to you as a ‘sister’ of the human family we all belong to. WE are connected! AND you my brother, I am tired of hearing negative things about you and now I am mad at how you are treating yourself. So please do not take this wrong or feel I am coming at you to scold or beat you up with my words. I am coming to you because I CARE and LOVE YOU!

What brought me to the point of writing this open letter was after reading ALLHIPHOP.com Hip-Hop Rumors on your new song, “U.O.E.N.O.” (you ain’t even know it) titled: YOWZA! New Rick Ross Lyric Will Upset Smart Women! So yeah I’m a little upset and rightfully so as the lyric you wrote about refers to ‘date rape’ and is exactly how I lost my virginity; someone STOLE it at the age of 14 before entering in high school. I take responsibility for being at a party I had no business being at but I want you to know how scary this now 41-year-old woman felt to wake up to blood on the sheets with an aching pain and empty feeling, that your heart is sunken where you feel you lost something. Well I did, I lost the right to choose whom I wanted to share that special moment with because I was knocked out and taken advantage of. See William, your lyric doesn’t educate it only further glamorize what fools like that man did to me 27 years ago. I happen to believe in karma and I know that man got his without me having to lift a finger.

William, I’m concerned about your health and your life messing with the wrong people and feel you are not listening to the GOD in you. I believe things that are happening to you now is because it’s GOD saying SLOW THE EFF down, get control of your life, you are not on the path destined. William, that means not at the expense of yourself or others. I understand this entertainment industry with expertise of over 20 years and can impart wisdom as I just shared my experience with date rape. Additionally, in my youth, I have been associated with gang members, dealt with being a borderline diabetic so weight/eating has always been an issue for me most of my life and basically led a self-destructed life. Why? because I really did not love myself. Additionally, I have 7 children and 3 grand babies (known to many as the Hip-Hop Mama) where I was recently diagnosed with breast cancer… So William, I’m not the type of mom, sister or friend that judges let alone condone certain things, I take accountability for my actions, I take responsibility for how I live and educate my children; making them aware of as much as I can in life – good and bad, never hiding truth and the ugliness this world has to offer. Right now though I am in the process of healing self and fully loving me. I believe this may be something missing in your life. I am sure you are trying to work on your health issues?!!? I am not sure what’s going on with all this gang/gun/court mess but I do not like it and I have been praying and meditating on you for a while.

“You must choose your battles wisely.” Words I have heard and keep hearing because I did not learn my lesson until now…

William, those lyrics on date rape to your actions all say to me you need help and healing yet we cannot take that first step for you. YOU MUST CHOSE A SIDE and not at the expense of your health, your life or to further perpetuate the hurt and pain of others.

William, we are all survivors, KINGS and QUEENS! I hope you make your way back to being able to show us that courage and strength. Being vulnerable is not a sign for weakness; it shows you are a man. I will continue to pray yet this is a call for you to take some other type of action before you will be another fallen Hip-Hop artist like so many others we lost. I believe and LOVE YOU WILLIAM. Please show me something different good!

RESPECTFULLY, your sister

dee dee “Hip-Hop Mama” cocheta

Sunday, March 24, 2013

Atlanta Rapper Friedel "Sy Yung" Pinkston gets casted in "42" The Jackie Robinson Story

 Atlanta Rapper Friedel "Sy Yung" Pinkston hits 1st move role in "42" The Jackie Robinson Story 
By NerveDjs own DjBigO317
Dreams do come true when one door closes another one opens a real american story of "Sy Yung"

 
 
Meet Friedel "Sy Yung" Pinkston one of the 1st Serious Young Artist that I started working with back in 2009, Born Friedel Pinkston was raised in Hartwell a small town in Northeast georiga. He grew up in a urban area influenced by sports and music. Though some of Sy Yung's peers were involved in street activities, Sy Yung sought out better ways to be successful. Coming out of a small town Sy was recruited by MLB scouts and traveled the world constantly displaying his talents on the field. Before he graduated High School he worked his way to be one of the Top 5 Pitchers in the country. Working his way to the Top 5 of the MLB draft charts in the nation which he achieved All-American Honors. But due to an unexpected injury that dream fell through and his ambition has ventured him into his second love Music. 
 
I salute him cause he and his music got me "DjBigO317 out of retirement... thats how Great his Music really is. It takes a special person to have a great personality to weather the lies & bullshit the Music Industry keeps throwing up. I told him in 2009 don't just do Music but also do Modeling & Acting thats how you build your brand... in April 2013 his life will change forever, he has a small part in a Major League Big Screen Movie. He will be in "42" The Jackie Robinson Story with Chadwick Boseman & Harrison Ford!! Please Share with ur Friends & Family Thank You 
 
 







 
 

 
                          OLIVER "DjBigO317"JACKSON CEO of  Trucker Bangin Ent. llc
 
                                "Hear Trucker Bangin Ent. Artists & Djs on a RadioStation near You"
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Friday, March 22, 2013

ALL BETS ARE ON KEViN BLACK TO MAKE IT HAPPEN!"

Bill Oxford talks to the owner of U Can Fly Holdings Kevin Black about his career, his 4-F Theory and his view of the current music scene interview Middle of May came around and Reddogg Music CEO, Michael Neely offered me a rare glimpse inside the upper echelon of a major record label. I sat there for no more than a tenth of second and said, “I’m ready”. I’d have to ask myself and all those around, “How can I turn that down?” The man I spoke to was none other than former Sr. V.P. at Interscope Records and presently the owner of U Can Fly Holdings, Kevin Black. This was new ground for me to cover, but I took it on like a global conquest. Prior to this encounter I had no idea him and I have a commonality in that we share a background in promotions. In hindsight, this made it easier to a degree for us to relate. Mr. Black’s U Can Fly Holdings is a company specializing in marketing and promotions on a global scale; one built off integrity and a non-stop eagerness to exceed any expectations. Mountains are nothing but speed bumps to this entrepreneur. T hey don’t call him Kevin “All Bets On” Black for nothing! My initial conversation was an encouraging exchange of dialogue. I tried to be personable because I know I’m from Chicago and I don’t want anyone from outside my hometown to get the impression that Chicago lacks professionalism. I asked Kevin, who’s from N.Y.C. and currently residing in L.A., how he was doing. I heard an up-beat tone in Mr. Black’s voice letting me know he wanted to get his thoughts and life out there to the people. So, in response Kevin said, “I’m good. I’m trying to be you!” Here I was, perplexed on why he’d want to be me, so I had to ask him, “Why do you say that Sir?” Without hesitation Kevin replied, “Because you’re a winner!” I answered by saying, “Yes, I’d like to think of myself as a winner.” A few days later, the interview took place and Mr. Black gave the inside scoop on many aspects of his professional life, also what exactly a top ranked major record executive is looking for in the next great talent. After making it from being a roadie for Run-DMC to being a DJ, also having the drive, charisma and business savvy to achieve his present label status, this is what Kevin had to say. Where did you grow up? K.B. - New York City. The Bronx. How did your childhood experiences mold the man you’ve become? K.B. - My mother told me, “Anything in life you want, just go for it.” People don’t plan to fail. They fail to plan. If you concentrate on a solid plan you can get anywhere you want to go. T hings change for people and the direction they take in life, so what was your initial plan growing up? K.B. - Just to be successful. Whatever I got into I would live it, want it, create it and make it happen. I didn’t have a dream like I was going to be in the music business. It fell into my lap and I took advantage of it. I started working it, but did I have a plan that I would be this successful in the music business? No, but I use my 4-F Theory. That is, you must treat people in a Friendly way and what I mean is, treat people the way you want to be treated. Secondly, you must be Firm. When you talk to somebody, have an opinion. Say Yes. Say No. Say I don’t know. Say I’ll think about it. The third F stands for being Focused. Know what your plan is. Know how to get there. Know what you have to do to get there and know how to prepare for all it takes to make it. Be focused, but don’t get so focused that you can’t see all the obstacles coming towards you, or sneaking up on you. Keep your eyes open and always be ready to re-forecast / re-focus. Sometimes you have to take 2 steps back to take 4 steps forward. The fourth F, well I’ll keep it clean and say you have to know when to say Forget It! So it’s Friendly, Firm, Focused and know when to say Forget It! Those are my 4 F’s. I live my life by that and if you live your life by that too, I guarantee that you will be successful. You’ve defined how to become successful and laid down a mental strategy on how to get there, but what exactly is success in your book? K.B. - There’s no set idea for what success is. I mean, you could have success by being rich in spirit, rich in money and rich in knowledge. Success is not a design. Right now, success for me is peace of mind. To get where you are professionally today, what’s the person or moment that pushed the button inside of you and had you convinced this was your path in life? K.B. - It was a combination of both things you said. I’d have to bring up a couple guys who helped guide me and my career. (Mr. Black paused not wanting to forget anyone) One was Steve Berman. Another was Jimmy Iovine. Also Suge Knight, Tom Walley and last but not least, Doug Johnson. Those 5 people helped my career a great deal. (Kevin sat in a state of deep thought pondering what events have stood out) A good executive,or just a good person, either one possessing staying power, they all go through adversity and overcome it. So it’s like when you can go from the bottom and to the top repeatedly, you become a well-rounded executive and person. One moment that let me know I was true to this business is when I took Eminem who was one of my hardest projects and made him into one of the most popular rappers of today’s time. How did you go about that? Meaning, what role did you play in his development? K.B. - I had to break the record first. There are many people that helped Eminem’s career. I was just part of the front team in the beginning that had to break it. Try breaking the rapper that’s White in a predominantly Black field and telling them this rapper is the best when nobody really knew him. It came to be a tough job. Where are you from? Milwaukee? (I responded) “I’m from Chicago.” (Kevin continued describing the struggle he faced years earlier.) K.B. - Try going to Cabrini Green before they started putting up condos. Try to go there and say, “Hey! We’ve got this new rapper Eminem that no one’s heard a record on and he’s Hot Try to sell it to the hood. It’s a tough sale. Now everybody loves him because he is what I said he was in the beginning. One of the greats. What’s your perspective on Suge Knight? K.B. - I think Suge Knight was a visionary and I think what he’s done for the rap business has been good. He had great artists. I could never say anything bad about Suge Knight because he gave me a shot. He has a very forthcoming attitude like what you see is what you get. If it wasn’t for Suge I wouldn’t be as far as I am today. He said, “Hey! I like the way you promote records. Let me put you on. Check this out! He gave me a rope and he let me do what I do and I was very successful. So do you have any opinion on the controversy surrounding the circumstances of Tupac’s death? (I could sense a bit of irritation in Kevin’s voice as he replied) K.B. - You ask me, what do I think about that situation??? I can’t think about it because I don’t know the whole story. If somebody knew the whole story it would be on trial. There are 3 parts to the truth. There’s the person who’s saying it, there’s another person with an objective and then there’s the truth. Which one do we believe? I’m mean, I Don’t Know! I try to stick to what I’m good at and that’s marketing and promoting records. What type of music do you listen to in your free time
K.B. - I listen to everything because being a Promotions guy, you want to always keep your knives sharp. You always want to keep your wits about you. I listen to Rock, Oldies but Goodies, Jazz, R&B or what they refer to as ‘baby making music’. It’s a matter of finding the people who do listen to it and those that don’t. (Kevin comes across as a quick study when it comes to demographics) What do you see as the most notable road block in your career to date? K.B. - Looking for the next hit. Does it really all come down to that? K.B. - Looking for the next hit record? Yeah! Everybody’s looking for the next hit. How do you go about stepping away from your profession? Do you have any hobbies? K.B. - I go to the gym and try to keep my weight down. I love to look at boxing and basketball. I think OKC (the NBA’s Oklahoma City Thunder) will be the Champions this year. With boxing, I think Manny Pacquiao is getting ready to fight Tim Bradley and he’s going to lose. In Floyd Mayweather’s last fight (referring to the unanimous decision win over Miguel Cotto), he showed why he is the Champ. And I think that the rap game of today is switching guards and it’s about to jump back up in the next 3 years. (I had to ask what exactly he meant by jumping “back up”) What do you mean by jumping “back up”? Are you talking about the quality of lyric? So it's Friendly, Firm, Focused and know when to say Forget it! Those are my 4 F's. Try to sell it to the hood. It’s a tough sale. Now everybody loves him because he is what I said he was in the beginning. One of the greats. What’s your perspective on Suge Knight? K.B. - I think Suge Knight was a visionary and I think what he’s done for the rap business has been good. He had great artists. I could never say anything bad about Suge Knight because he gave me a shot. He has a very forthcoming attitude like what you see is what you get. If it wasn’t for Suge I wouldn’t be as far as I am today. He said, “Hey! I like the way you promote records. Let me put you on. Check this out! He gave me a rope and he let me do what I do and I was very successful. So do you have any opinion on the controversy surrounding the circumstances of Tupac’s death? (I could sense a bit of irritation in Kevin’s voice as he replied) K.B. - You ask me, what do I think about that situation??? I can’t think about it because I don’t know the whole story. If somebody knew the whole story it would be on trial. There are 3 parts to the truth. There’s the person who’s saying it, there’s another person with an objective and then there’s the truth. Which one do we believe? I’m mean, I Don’t Know! I try to stick to what I’m good at and that’s marketing and promoting records. What type of music do you listen to in your free time? K.B. - I listen to everything because being a Promotions guy, you want to always keep your knives sharp. You always want to keep your wits about you. I listen to Rock, Oldies but Goodies, Jazz, R&B or what they refer to as ‘baby making music’. It’s a matter of finding the people who do listen to it and those that don’t. (Kevin comes across as a quick study when it comes to demographics) What do you see as the most notable road block in your career to date? K.B. - Looking for the next hit. Does it really all come down to that? K.B. - Looking for the next hit record? Yeah! Everybody’s looking for the next hit. How do you go about stepping away from your profession? Do you have any hobbies? K.B. - I go to the gym and try to keep my weight down. I love to look at boxing and basketball. I think OKC (the NBA’s Oklahoma City Thunder) will be the Champions this year. With boxing, I think Manny Pacquiao is getting ready to fight Tim Bradley and he’s going to lose. In Floyd Mayweather’s last fight (referring to the unanimous decision win over Miguel Cotto), he showed why he is the Champ. And I think that the rap game of today is switching guards and it’s about to jump back up in K.B. - No, I’m not talking about the quality. The reason why everybody thinks rap went downhill, or that it’s stagnate is because it’s changing the guard. The 10 Hot rappers back then were names like Puffy, Jay-Z, Nelly, Eminem, Snoop, Dr. Dre, DMX, Ja Rule, ect… Those were some of the big dogs back then. Now, the game in a way is going full circle. Those guys are going to be legends and now we have the newcomers coming in. Once they get in, then things will move to the next level. How do you feel the World Wide Web has benefited and/ or hampered artists in the music business and record sales across the board? K.B. - I don’t think the Web has affected it (as in sales). I think it made the record companies get a little smarter because the Web knows that the consumer is lazy. The consumer wants things Right Now and that’s what the Web provides. If you want something, you can go right to it, get it and make it happen. Do you like the direction the music is moving in? K.B. - Some of the stuff I like and some I don’t like. What don’t you like? What can be changed to make the music better? K.B. - All these records with ALL these dances??? I mean, HotDamn, how many dances can we have? The Jerk, the Reject, the Push Down, the Snap Your Fingers, the Pop Your… (Kevin stopped himself briefly) I like people such as J-Cole, Chris Brown, ect… There are a couple of artists out there with some new stuff that might be something to talk about, but that’s what the rap game is about. What is it you would be doing if you didn’t find a home, or niche in the music industry? K.B. - Marketing and promotions for one of these Fortune 500 companies because I have a marketing degree as a 1986 graduate of Domingus Hills University in California. Also, something dealing with educating people because I believe knowledge is king. For all the artists out there claiming a reputation in the underground indie music scene, what’s the best word of advice you can give them? K.B. - Use my 4-F Theory that I discussed earlier. Keep good consulting. Don’t just jump into the business and think that even though you haven’t been in the business that you’ll try things your way. Go to people who have been in the business and ask for advice and then take it home and absorb it. Then do what you need to do to make it work for you. You MUST and I repeat you MUST not take the record you made and just play it for your friends. Play it for everybody and don’t tell them that it’s you. You’ll get a better and more truthful opinion. Like if I told you now, “Bill, I spent 6 months on this single. This single is Hot! Wait til’ you hear it! It’s called “I’ll Take You There”. Bill, I wrote this with my life on it. I was going through something. T his song is Hot! I want you to listen to it Bill. I want your honest opinion Bill. Listen to right now! It’s the shit!” Here I am standing right there. Are you really going to be able to tell me, “It sucks,” or will you say, “I’ll have to hear it a second time later”? Because people sometimes let their passions stop them from accepting the truth. Who do you consider to be the most inspiring people in your life? K.B. - My biggest inspirations would have to be both of my children; my daughter and my son. How can you as an executive make sure the next #1 hit has substance in it, instead of the “cookie cutter” music we hear on the radio? K.B. - That’s a question with a double edged sword. The public decides that. You cannot dictate what the public wants and opens their eyes to it. Nobody can do that, because if someone else could do that, then please, I’d give that person anything they need for that knowledge. The public is what decides what’s Hot and what’s not. Whether it’s cookie-cutter music, or not. Some of these singers start off singing Opera, but if Opera doesn’t work then some of them start singing R&B, and if R&B doesn’t work then they might go to Rock. People don’t know this, but when Pink first came out, she was an R&B singer. You mentioned that you were a roadie for Run-DMC when you first started in the mid-late 80’s. What was that experience like? K.B. - If you’re the luggage man, you’re at the lowest spot on the totem pole. The janitor could fire you, but you pay your dues. As I worked my way up I started to meet new people. I thank the members of Run-DMC for giving me a shot because it really opened up my life and let me know this is a business where everybody needs a chance. Rest in Peace to JMJ! Did you have any type of personal rapport with him? K.B. - Jam Master Jay was a fun dude. He was a Hot DJ! A trendsetter. He was cool people to talk to. I can remember him and I drinking a little Jack Daniels one time. All of them were fun guys to be around when you’re on the road with them! How was it living on the West Coast and being one of the most popular DJ’s in the late 80’s? K.B. - It was good. You know, every DJ wants to say they’re the Hottest DJ, but I always wanted to be the first DJ to break a new record. I always wanted to feel like I was that dude. Music was everything. I come from New York City and music was in the streets, in the parks and stores too. It was everywhere. Being a DJ, I was only doing what I was raised around. Since you’ve assisted in marketing for Rap-A-Lot Records, describe J-Prince and your rapport? K.B. - J-Prince is in my top 5 entrepreneurs. He’s the type of guy that can turn nothing into something and make something work that the next man failed with. How do you benefit most from your profession? K.B. - I benefit because I’ve had the chance to travel the world, see different lifestyles and cultures. From what my eyes and ears have seen and heard, I gained the ability to be a better marketing and promotions exec. That alone taught me a lot. Being in the entertainment business, you see everything from A to Z and Z to A. I’m not the person to say that I’ve seen it all, but hey, if I haven’t seen it yet, I want to. Styles change, but the fight game never changes. Other than joining the staff at Interscope, what’s been your best moment as a professional? K.B. - That would be opening my own professional marketing and promotions company called, U Can Fly Co. It’s nothing like being an entrepreneur and owning your own company. It’s a feeling that every man and woman should experience. If you start your own company, you can use your creative juices. You learn how to turn a piece of ground beef into a steak, also how to turn a steak into a feast and make that feast feed millions. Are there any moments you wish you had back when you could’ve done things differently? K.B. - There have been moments, but the worst moments come when I have to tell an artist what they NEED to hear when they don’t want to hear it. T he brutal truth? K.B. - Yes. You have some artists who can take it and others who can’t. Then you have some artists that run into a wall and when they hit the wall because of their own intuition, they’re good. It can get bad when I have to sit down and do a 1 on 1 with an artist and let them know why I’m doing things this way, or what they can do for themselves. Sometimes artists can’t take the truth. Say I know someone who’s a reputable indie artist and looking for a record deal, distribution and marketing, the whole 9. What exactly do you look for? K.B. - First of all, I’m looking for a Hit record. A Hit record will solve everything. I look at the artist to see if they are different. T hen I look for the track to see if it’s Hot! After that, I look at what the artist is doing and who they’ll be compared to. Then I look and assess how I’ll be able to market the person/artist. If you’re a rapper and you’re 55 years old, I think it’s time we say “No.” I take a sharp look at all the tools you possess that are placed in front of me and make an analysis. What are some of the newest, hottest artists presently signed to Interscope? K.B. - At this time, there are a lot of artists we’ve signed, old and new. If you notice, you don’t have to be new to make a hit. Like some of these new rappers like 2-Chainz, a hot rapper and he’s new, but you have a veteran like Angie Stone who made the best album of hers I’ve ever heard since she’s been in the game. T hen you have Mary J. Blige, a huge star, making a cross-over that is incredible. When you think you’ve seen it all, something new is coming. Music is always evolving. It’ll always get better, whether it comes from a veteran, or a rookie. That’s what I love about this game! (Kevin paused before he spoke about the highly regarded Mary J. Blige) I think Mary J. Blige is going to another level in her career and her fans are moving with her. No matter what anyone says, Mary will always be, in my book the Queen of Hip Hop and the woman that makes records everyone can touch on and feel. If you could plan your future, where will you be in 10 years? K.B. - If I could, I just want to be a hot entrepreneur and be able to say that when I was in the game, “Wow! Things were really happening!” Honestly, I don’t want to be the billionaire and the top dog just to walk around and shake people’s hands. I just want to be a person that can say, “When I was in the music business, I had FUN!” I did a lot of things and I’ll always thank God, because it’s through Him that all of this has been possible. Are there any other gems of advice you’d like to leave behind for all the readers to take with them in life
Written by Bill Oxford / @X10magazine

How too promote your music on twitter ..

If you want to promote your music on Twitter, there’s enough good data out there to inform your social media promotion efforts and help you maximize the effectiveness of each and every tweet.

First, schedule your tweets at peak hours to get them in front of the most eyes. Second, you want to write tweets that encourage action (retweeting, purchasing, replying, etc.)!

We recently attended a webinar by the internet marketing experts at HubSpot called “The Science of Twitter.” It’s full of interesting Twitter stats and best-practices. Many of the most memorable tips fell into the category of “I can’t believe I haven’t already made a habit of it!”

Below are a handful of those common sense tips from HubSpot (but check out the full webinar for more great info).

Promote your music on Twitter: 7 ways to smarten-up your tweets

1. Longer tweets get more clicks. Internet marketers like to tell you to keep things short. But a tweet is only 140 characters, so it’s one of the few cases online where you actually benefit from using all the space you’re allotted.

2. Use more verbs. Less nouns. We’re emotionally stirred by action! So make your tweets sing, screech, punch, and dance.

3. Tweet in the afternoon and evening. After 2pm, Twitter traffic increases fairly dramatically. Maybe folks feel like they’ve got enough work done for the day that they can afford to sneak in 5 minutes on Twitter. So schedule your tweets with those people in mind.

4. Tweet closer to the weekend. As the workweek draws to a close, Twitter traffic soars — with Friday being the busiest day. So your heaviest Twitter activity should be on Thursday and Friday.

5. Ask for the retweet (“pls RT”). A lot of times in life the simplest way to get something is to ask. The same goes for Twitter. People are far more likely to retweet your content if you ask them.

6. Spread tweets out by at least 1 hour. You want to get the most people possible to see your tweets. By spreading out your Twitter activity by at least an hour, you’re increasing the likelihood of different folks seeing your activity. Plus you’re not annoying your followers by cluttering up their news feeds all at once.

7. Try putting the link towards the beginning of the tweet. Sure, 60-80% of your tweets should link to interesting content. But there’s also evidence to suggest that you should place that URL towards the beginning of your tweet. In many A/B tests between similar tweets, the one with the URL up front performed better.

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How have you promoted your music on Twitter? What works? What doesn’t? We’d love to hear about your experiences in the comments section below.

The Huge Benefits of Licensing Your Music

With all the changes that have been going on in the music industry over the past decade, one of the biggest and most lucrative has been the rise of music licensing. It is now very common to hear your favorite song not only on the radio, but on tv shows, commercials, and video games as well. This can only be great news for artists and musicians whose goal is to share their music with as many people as possible. Despite all this, there are still some musicians who feel that licensing your music is similar to “selling out” to corporations. So we’re going to discuss a few of the benefits of having your music licensed.
The number one most important benefit of licensing your music is exposure, exposure, exposure! One of the main reasons people write and record their music is so that others can listen to and enjoy it. Sure, some people may be in it just for the money, but any band or singer who’s played a great show where the audience was really into your music knows that there is no greater feeling of accomplishment. Before the dawn of the digital era, it was very difficult to get your music out to the masses except for the traditional distribution methods like radio and cd stores. Now, you can literally write and record a song on your computer and share it with people all around the world in five minutes. That should be a clear indicator to skeptics that the business has changed and it’s time to get in to the licensing game. Having your music placed on a 30 second iPod commercial today has the potential to jumpstart your career in ways never before imagined. Even if it’s just for a small independent film, the people who are watching those movies are the exact kind of people that you will want to expose your music to. And now thanks to the internet and song id apps, anyone can listen to your song, find out who you are, go to your website, join your fanclub, and buy your whole album in a matter of minutes. All of these steps are essential to building a strong foundation of fans, and you’re only helping yourself by exposing your music to the masses

Another benefit of licensing your music is the money! Of course you’re not going to just give away your music to a video game for free; you get paid! And for many struggling musicians, this can be the difference between being able to pay next month’s rent and not. While all placements differ in the amount of money paid (some won’t pay anything at all, but the exposure could be great!) you can usually expect to get anywhere from several hundred to several thousand dollars for a song placement. And for the big films and tv shows, that number can jump up to 20-30 grand. You’re also usually paid up front for your song placement so there’s no long waiting period to get your hard earned money.

Another benefit that is akin to gaining exposure is building up your resume. If you’re an independent band who is looking to take their career to the next level, securing a manager and publicist are two very important steps. If you’re able to secure several small song placements, it can go a long way in building up your resume and showing potential managers that you are serious about your work, and that other people have noticed it too. And you never know, maybe a potential manager or publicist heard your work through various projects and decides to seek you out. The only thing that’s guaranteed in this business is that there is no single path to success, so you should be doing everything you can to try and succeed. If you put yourself out there enough times, the odds are that someone, somewhere will take an interest in your work. So don’t leave it to chance; get out there and make your music work for you!

13 Dos and Don'ts Of Performing At Open Mics

DON’T play and leave.

DO talk to EVERYONE and remember their names. You can even write their name and description and review it at the end of the night. They will be so impressed the next week.

DON’T expect to be discovered. This is a networking opportunity with other musicians. Open mics only lead to gigs if you work your contacts and follow up.

DON'T just say "Good job". Be specific and sincere like "I really liked your hook" or "Your low range sounds great!" so they know you were paying attention.

DO introduce others. Even if you aren't interested in collaborating with someone, maybe you can give someone a good lead.

DON’T heckle. No one wants you to request Free Bird.

DO be gracious. If only one person is listening, play just for that person, and yourself.

DON’T talk loudly over a ballad. Everyone chats, just be respectful about it.

DO play contrasting songs. (One slow, one fast, one in major, one in minor, etc.)

Similarly, DON’T play two songs in the same key back-to-back. Even if an audience doesn't know, their ears will start to get bored.

DON’T apologize before you play a song. People want you to be excited about your song, not hear excuses for why it's going to suck.

DO make friends with the host, bartenders, and all staff. People like to work with their friends, so be a friend to everyone you meet.

DO have fun! If it's not fun, what's the point?

Robin Yukiko is a Berklee College of Music grad, singer-songwriter, pianist, and music educator in San Francisco. She hosts the SF Singer-Songwriters’ Workshop at the Musicians Union Local 6. Learn more at www.robinyukiko.com.

Thursday, March 21, 2013

How too sell your music on Facebook & twitter

This is some thing that every indie artist in the music business need too have. This will guide you threw the steps on how too use your Facebook or twitter too sell your music. Please click on the link below http://members.cdbaby.com/campaigns/SellMoreMusicWithFacebook.pdf

Recording Vocals Professionally in a Home Studio

The problem with recording vocals in a professional or home studio is… Well, just that… The act of recording vocals.

There is nothing natural about it. The human voice is the most complex and finicky instrument there is, and it takes quite a bit of technical outsmarting and finesse to effectively capture an accurate representation of the audible vibrations emitted from an individual's’ vocal chords. Unlike recording a guitar, acoustic OR electric, a piano, or almost any other instrument, vocal recording presents a few unique challenges, namely, the critical nuances of the tracking process in regards to the direct effect on the captured performance.

I’ve written lots more technical and procedural articles on Vocal Recording Tips here.

But while most of the articles online focus on the recording process from an engineer’s perspective, which IS important, in this article I am going to speak more from the singer’s vantage point and deliver advanced tips that will hopefully be very helpful for singers/home recordists and perhaps even provide some insight and techniques for engineer/producers as well.

In about 9 years of producing vocals in my home studio, I must have tried about everything…

I’ve tried all kinds of tracking methods. I’ve tried many microphones, many mic positions, all kinds of acoustic treatment solutions from reflective filters to absorbers, to hanging duvet-vocal-booths, to every kind of plugin across many many manufacturers. I’ve tried out several schools of thought, and I’ve brainstormed what I’ve found to be the most critical pieces of advice that I could give in regards to Recording Vocals in a home studio.

I’ve condensed that knowledge down into five primary points - that if utilized effectively would give anyone with decent preamps and a low budget condenser mic-the ability to record professional vocal tracks in their home studio.

The 5 Keys To Professional Vocal Recordings:

Do ALL You Can With WHAT You Got

One of the challenges about producing music in a home recording studio, especially for those without much experience or perspective, is that you can easily go to extremes… Either on the OCD, technically perfectionistic.. Must. Be. Just. Right. But. never quite is… Or on the other hand, get lazy… All the way down to procrastinate. Either way, not getting things DONE.

I’ll definitely admit to having done both…

But the key, to keeping your chops fresh on the recording side, as well as getting the best sounding vocals for each song-is that you are active with each song.

You have to try stuff out. Tinker and explore. Everyone always harps on Mic Placement, but how can you can’t find the SWEET spot in a room if you don’t curiously experiment with it? You should really be familiar with and know how to maximize the best qualities of each component in your rig. Don’t settle for the “this is just the sound of my room,” or “I just don’t have the tools yet,” excuses…

If you have great preamps get the majority of your signal pumping out of THEM, if you’ve got way too much reflection and echo, go and sew two duvets together and attach to the joists in your ceiling (or something) with hanger-wire in a circle. Smooth sounding vocal tent in several hours. It works like a charm for the $40-50 cost of fabric from target.

Knowing the microphones strengths and weaknesses, as well as the singer’s voice type should go without saying.

The key here is that you are creatively learning how to use everything you have, most effectively.

I’m sure I don’t need to remind you how important the vocals are, and how powerful a well produced vocal performance can have on a song. Not only does it significantly impact the emotional response the listener will have, but it can easily mean the difference between a Film and TV placement or not.

Get Your Mic and Vocal Tracks Prepped First

As I’ve covered in other tutorials in much more depth, this is the name of the game for capturing the best performances for EACH song.

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve kicked myself for not ironing out the details and doing my prep-work before capturing the best vocal performance for a song during a one off scratch performance that was inspired, and which I did not capture properly.

Choose the mic for the song, get the levels adjusted, understand the arrangement and/or strip down the headphone mix for the song, have it ready to go. So when you get that brilliant melody idea or record that scratch performance that turns out to be PERFECT, you can proudly transition into the mixing phase with a satisfied smile on your face!

The VOCAL is the Most Important Piece of Equipment

That’s right, the VOCAL. Thus, take care of the vocalist! We can be fussy about nuances, but cut us some slack, so are engineers, they just don’t have to listen to themselves back on record!

Singers, you must remember this… You are playing an instrument. Your voice must be well maintained and you’re instrument tuned and warmed up. It is 90% performance, and 10% everything else that chisels and polishes the first 90%.

If your voice, (or if you are producing someone else's) is not respected, massaged and coaxed to inspire and facilitate the best performance of that instrument, then you are not doing your best to create the best record you can.

Now, you know this.. You have heard it… But you cannot hear it enough, because it really is the performance that makes the record.

Key Vocal Frequencies

Before we get into setting suggestions and tips, what you should know is where your voice shines best. Both in and outside the mix of a song. My voice shows off a cutting smoky crispness between 2100-2400khz, and a smooth and balanced body is brought out around 750hz.

It’s helpful to know these, but it’s much more of an exercise of becoming aware of these frequencies, and seeing which key vocal frequencies sound best for the song.

I mean, for most it’s no mystery that the real trick to vocal production is to slot the vocal by finding and highlighting the frequencies that make the vocal standout and sound best, and then cutting those frequencies from other secondary instruments which are competing for them. Vocal takes priority, always. Find where it sounds best, and carve that space out in the mix.

Tracking Setting Suggestions

Ahhh, here we go. The moment you’ve all been waiting for… Well I might as well heighten the anticipation by saying that it’s taken me a long time to find this “Magic Formula,” that if followed, step by step, will immediately get your records play on the radio and make you millions! And now I shall unveil it to you, free of charge… Lol. Sorry folks, I couldn’t resist! :)

The fact is that when I started tracking vocals many many years ago, I recorded naked. No effects added. After tracking with every kind of compressor, with and without EQ boosts, tape saturation plug-ins, special abbey road plugins that boost 8k… I was searching for anyway to somehow give me that elusive little “Extra,” or special technical trick that would make women's panties instantaneously drop upon listening…

I found out what most seasoned seasoned producers and engineers are probably already grinning about now…
It’s all about a transparently great performance. No effects, just good old mic placement, mic technique, and a high quality singer.

Now, I don’t mean to sound so melodramatic about it, it wasn’t like I was bloodthirsty for some elusive crack pipe that would turn into a genie and grant me eternal happiness…

But I’m smart, I’m technically savvy, I’ve got an audio production and engineering degree, and I’m a singer with a home studio… So i can experiment and will surely find some little trick that makes me sound - golly gee unfathomably GREAT, every-time, without trying!

Well, it’s kind of a boring answer, and you’ve heard it before… But it’s best to just track a clean performance that sounds good prior to any added effects.

Anyway, there are tricks like parallel compression, highly compressed stacked whispering support tracks, and such…

But the real trick… IS a well prepared vocalist, good mic selection/placement, great gain staging, and an INSPIRED performance.

Disclaimer: There are of course some people who are going to prefer to use a little bit of their favorite compression, and you can roll of at 100hz give or take a few, there is nothing wrong with this, and in fact you should test everything out for yourself. Certainly, and other people’s mileage may vary, but let’s not go there. Pro’s know what i’m talking about, regardless of whether or not they track with a bit of compression on their next project.

Key Takeaways
If it doesn’t sound great without any effects, than you need to work on your mic placement and/or mic technique.

If you think you NEED compression for tracking, you haven’t properly setup your gain structure.

Again, rolling off the low end is something I do frequently, and 100hz is a good rule of thumb.

*I know the “technical” objections to the Reflexion Filter, but I tried one, and I love it. Very nice and easy to get an accurate crisp recording. Great on both vocals and guitar.

Recording with a Stripped Down Headphone Mix

This last one is-like all of these, nothing new, but I’ve personally found it to be a real jewel for recording better vocals.

Strip the mix down to simply the bare essentials either in a headphone mix, or if it’s just you, by muting and decreasing levels. Just the main instrument guitar/piano, and whatever else is needed to help define the groove.
It makes it sooo much easier for me to hear myself and not drown in the sea of sound my ears are steady trying to swim in as I sing. For most of us, singing is much easier and much more natural when we can hear ourselves naturally fill a room. The stripped down mix makes it much easier to track, and you can always “one ear out it” with your cans. :)

So there you have it. Maybe that’ll even save you a couple of years. It really is all in getting really good at the basics.
But I want to hear from YOU! Do you agree, is there anything you’d add, or are there any tips you’d like to share with us as well? What are the real jewels for your vocal production?

You can follow me on twitter @Dagrahyndmusic
Connect with me on www.LinkedIn.com/reddoggmusic

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

The Rise Of Social Media For Musicians

With the rise of the Internet, a lot of the marketing power has been put back into the hands of independent artists. Today, a lot of artists can promote themselves to fans for the cost of essentially nothing. Tons of online social platforms have started to pop up, and a lot of them have become hotspots for both music marketing efforts and fans seeking new talent. This makes self-promotion a lot easier, and almost entirely cuts out the need for a big promotion budget. The important part is the artist or band taking advantage of these many free opportunities, and utilizing all of them properly and consistently.

Facebook and Twitter are two of the most well known online platforms currently. Here, artists can interact directly with current and potential fans alike, and link to different media, whether that is their music, videos, blog, etc. They also have the biggest membership base, which gives the greatest potential of growth to artists. Presence on these social media platforms is almost mandatory for any aspiring artist. Artists must also stay on top of these because lack of use could mislead potential fans into thinking the artist is no longer actively making music. Plus, it keeps your fans engaged and excited.

Another great resource is MySpace. Probably the most overlooked due to its fall a few years ago, but it is very useful as an electronic press kit (EPK). It brings all different aspects of your music, band information, fans, and tour dates into one simple webpage. It serves less as a medium to interact with fans, and more of an outlet to feature new material.

Other online platforms every band should utilize are YouTube, Tumblr and MusicClout. All three of these serve different purposes, but they all can be used to further any artist’s career if used properly. YouTube allows artists to upload live shows and music videos, and then post them to your various pages. Tumblr allows artists to write stories while adding in other multi-media, which can allow fans see a more personal side of the artist. MusicClout allows your EPK to be seen by tons of different music industry related opportunities, and lets you make connections with a variety of different professionals.

Social media is essential to any artist. It allows you to effectively engage with fans and directly interact with them, as well as get noticed by big industry professionals.

Effectively Utilize Your Youtube Music Videos

Career Advice

If your band is not already on Youtube, you need to stop reading this and go create an account. For everybody else that already has an account, hopefully you’ve been utilizing it to its maximum effectiveness. If not, read on for some easy and helpful tips to improve your Youtube page.

First of all, you should make sure your Youtube Channel is looking the best that it can. Upload all of your band’s music videos and tweak your channel’s appearance so that it fits with the vibe of your band. If you don’t have music videos, you should upload any videos that involve your band. Try and get some friends to take videos of your live shows, or maybe take some behind the scenes videos while your band is in the recording studio. The key is to give your fans an inside look into what the members of the band are like off stage. Even if you already have music videos, behind the scenes videos are a great addition to your video collection.

Make sure to properly tag your videos! Think of as many descriptive keywords as possible and properly tag your videos. It’s also important to have a good thumbnail picture of your video to encourage users to check out your videos.

Share your videos! Make sure you post them to your Facebook and Twitter pages. It’s also a good idea to go through some of your favorite band’s videos and like them as well as subscribe to their channel. This will help give your fans a better idea of what kind of music you are in to. You should also be checking out local bands and liking their videos. A great way to grow your fanbase is to play with similar local bands whose fans would be into your music.

Make yourself accessible! You should always try to include your band’s website and contact information in the video description or the video itself. Make sure it’s clear and easy to read.

Get paid for your music! If you have a cdbaby account, you can easily imbed a music store onto your Youtube Channel. That way, when your fans go to check out your new music video, they can have the option to easily purchase the song right from your Youtube page.

Will Music Streaming Services Save The Recording Industry

Hot Topics in the Industry


Within the past decade we have seen the rise of digital music services such as iTunes and Amazon. Physical music sales started to decrease, and digital downloads started to surpass all other outlets. This was mostly due to being able to download a single song instead of having to purchase full albums. But now, another music service is starting to rise up and compete with these digital downloading services, and many record executives call it the future of music.

Streaming music from “the cloud” has become a very popular choice for many music listeners all around the world. Services like Spotify and Grooveshark allow you to listen to any of their songs at any time for free. You can also upgrade your service for a small monthly fee to remove ads and increase your benefits as a customer, which includes such perks as offline and mobile access. This allows listeners to have thousands of songs without the hassle of having to store it on your computer or purchase individually. The deal is even better for heavy music listeners.

But many music journalists and writers have reported that they might not be able to keep this popularity up while being controlled by major record companies. As reported by Gigaom.com (among others as well), these services are getting the low end of the deal in their relationships with the record companies. These deals include the record company getting one of the following (which ever is largest I might add): Pro-rata share of minimum of $X per subscriber, per-play costs at $Y per play, or Z percent of total company revenue, regardless of other business areas (Michael Robertson, Gigaom.com). To break it down, the record companies take whatever deals makes them the most money, thus leaving the music streaming companies hanging.

They also require equity in the company and initial payments from the streaming services, among others. This is extremely detrimental to these companies because they are getting a heavy portion of their profits split with the record companies, and no company can keep up this type of relationship without eventually being sucked completely dry. At the same, these companies solely rely on the record companies to supply their music, which is obviously what the whole business model revolves around. This makes it so they can’t just move on to a new supplier like another business would. These record companies essentially have a monopoly on the music streaming industry, and can create these heavily one-sided relationships.

Now we understand why the top record executives say this is the future of music, because they are able to run the companies while making a substantial profit off of them. It will be interesting to see the future of these companies and how they will adjust to the market and their relationship with the record companies, but as we see it now, major changes are going to have to be made in order for them to have a future.

http://gigaom.com/2011/12/11/why-spotify-can-never-be-profitable-the-secret-demands-of-record-labels/

MINISTA ZIN URU of HIP HOP

MINISTA ZIN URU
It seems like some people and on a larger scale; some cultures don’t get a fair shake. Hip Hop as a cultural phe- nomenon has withstood the test of time, adversity and the doubts set forth by those who thought it would only be a fad. From the negative stereotypes and publicity, to the unsolved murders of Hip Hop legends like Tupac, Biggie, Jam Master Jay, Scott La Rock, ect., the culture itself has still maintained an immensely popular global following. Throughout the years, Boogie Down Productions lead KRS-One has taken individuals under his wing who are serious about assisting in
the preservation of Hip Hop. One of those apprentices is a West coast native by the name of Minista Zin Uru. The Mini- sta took ample time to absorb all that was taught by The Teacha and continues to spread the Gospel of Hip Hop to the masses worldwide. He’s found great personal joy and satisfaction knowing that he, as a Minista, has affected the people in a positive, uplifting manner and that Hip Hop will never die on his clock. Take some time out of your day to catch up on the life, inspirations, struggles and spiritual growth of one bold and thought provoking, Minista Zin Uru.
All music enthusiasts have their roots in tunes from the past. My mother would play music around me when I was a wild, young child, so I ask you; has the Hip Hop culture always been your number one love? What other genres of music do you listen to?
Hip Hop hit me at a very young age when “Planet Rock” was released. I’d have to say that was when I was in 5th grade. Madonna, Prince, Michael Jackson, Twisted Sister, Quiet Riot and a lot of the rock bands come to mind, but when I heard “Planet Rock” and “The Freaks Come Out at Night”, it had my attention from there on out. I have a really deep affinity for that old school Hip Hop music like Run DMC, but after that I grew into listening to Public Enemy, Boogie Down Productions, N.W.A, amongst others, because that music really opened my eyes on a social level. When it comes down to it, I’m a music fan, just a fan of real music that comes from the heart and not solely for money.
Where did you grow up and how was it for you as a child?
I was raised in the small town of Antioch, California right around the East Bay area. As a youth in the suburbs, I’d go skate- boarding with my friends and get into a little trouble here and there, but nothing major. Philosophy grabbed my attention at an early age as I’d begin studying the Zen and Taoist philosophies. By the time I was 14 I started learning the Martial Arts.
What drew you towards philosophy early on?
There was no single event that got me into it. It was Bruce Lee, because he was on TV Saturday mornings and if I was lucky enough to wake up in time to catch part of one of his movies; that was like God to me. With all due respect, I was going to church at the time, but I would see his movies and how he moved, thought and spoke. It was like this whole other reality I was unaware of until Bruce came on the scene. An older friend introduced me to the book, “The Tao of Jeet Kune Do”, writ- ten by Bruce Lee. It’s a thorough description of his philosophy on life and the Martial Arts. That really opened up the doors to my mind. As I grew up, I noticed that his book really carried over into my everyday life.
Since you had the rare opportunity of being an apprentice of KRS-One in the Temple of Hip Hop; what’s the best piece of knowledge he ever gave you?
It’s how to be a good father. Beyond everything I’ve learned from the Gospel of Hip Hop and the Hip Hop culture itself; it’s getting to know him on a personal level and seeing how he interacts with his children as a father. That was something I truly appreciated.
How has KRS-One affected your life the most since you’ve learned so much from him?
Wow!! The thing about the Teacha is this. I joke around sometimes and ask people if they’ve seen the movie, “The Matrix”. It’s like going from one reality to a completely different one. I met him when I was 32 and he added so much to my whole way of thinking. Next thing I know, I was traveling around the world representing Hip Hop culture with the Teacha, hand-ing out the Gospel of Hip Hop and being in the studio with artists I admired growing up like Marly Marl and DJ Premier. I developed a love for the culture and a desire to protect it once I became part of it. The flipside is this, that during the whole transformation and process I went through, I took into account having a family and being away from them. Being able to
go on the road changed how I look at myself and the way I look at life. My process was like adapting to the Matrix. My life has changed in every way, shape and form. As events have occurred, I can’t help but to see a divine plan working itself out, because I could’ve never done any of this on my own.
What was your role with the 2009 Stop the Violence Movement?
Most of what I did would fall under administrative duties. I’d do whatever was called upon me to do. As a theme to the movement, we made a song called, “Self-Construction” as a tribute to the Hip Hop classic titled, “Self-Destruction”. “Self- Construction” has Nelly, Busta Rhymes, Talib Kweli and Neyo singing the hook. We tried to get that song out to the people and took it to the industry, but they literally closed their doors on us. It was a double edged sword, because we had a great project, but the industry showed its true colors wanting to promote their agenda.
Not to be a pessimist, but I don’t see much of a stop to the violence where I’m at in Chicago, so what do you think can be done on a legislative and social level to end, or sharply decrease the violence in the streets nationwide?
Well, on a legislative level, the legislators can all quit their jobs and let those of us in the streets that can really help to change things campaign for those positions. In Chicago, they’re doing a horrible job. This is our country, no matter what the mainstream media says. It’s not theirs. It is ours. Let me tell you something. Violence is natural. If you look at the world around us, you’ll see that nature is very violent. It’s non-violence that’s supernatural and comes from the spirit. When we advocate non-violence, we ask the people what causes violence and we usually get two answers. One always seems to be poverty. You can’t expect people who are impoverished and malnourished both physically and spiritually to make it out of that. Aside from poverty, the other cause is illiteracy. If people don’t have the words to describe what they’re feeling as a way to cope, they’re running off pure, raw emotion. As intelligent humans, we know there’s a frustration in the mind that can build up, but not if we are knowledgeable. If you can’t express yourself then you won’t be able to get out of your envi- ronment. The roots of Hip Hop culture were always based around non-violence, education and socio-economics where you can build and uplift a community. If you look at mainstream American culture, they promote violence. They (record execs) reward violence and illegal behavior, but they don’t live in the streets and see the effects of the violence first hand. I don’t know if it’s just a game they’re playing with people’s lives? If they are, that’s really twisted, but I hope that’s not the case.
What was so controversial about your documentary, “Tent City”?
KRS-One and I were in New Orleans promoting one of our shows, along with the Stop the Violence movement. We were driving on the freeway and saw what’s referred to in post-Hurricane Katrina as “Tent City”. There were thousands of people living in tents under the freeway, some of which needed medical attention and/or counseling. Poverty like that growing up was atrocious and to see something like Tent City; we had to film what we saw. It ended up being an 11 minute video that can be viewed on You-tube. We gave some of our pocket money to the people we encountered and filmed the area to raise awareness. Part of the controversy came from local community activists who in a way became jealous, because we didn’t include them in the film. We weren’t going to wait for one of their video crews. We decided to film it on the spot.
Describe in your own words your reaction to us never hearing much about convicted killers whose victims were rappers? What’s your perspective?
That’s a heavy subject. I remember working with Jam Master Jay before he passed. Hip Hop on a deeper level means some- thing to us as people and not just as fans. It’s injustice from top to bottom. It’s sad, because the intent of Hip Hop culture was never about that. It shows a lack of leadership in our community and an obvious immaturity. With Biggie and Pac, those are open cases still unresolved. Why does it have to be Hip Hop? Why Hip Hop? When a known rapper dies they parade it all over the news, but where’s that same attention and passion in finding out who killed them?
Who are some of your favorite Hip Hop artists coming into the game recently? Lupe Fiasco, Yelawolf and Soulie, even a new emcee from North Carolina named Chachillie.
What in life was your driving force prior to Hip Hop becoming part of your life?
It was a search for God and a search for a free spirit. I was always in a search for knowledge and truth. I feel that I’ve devel- oped a relationship with the higher Creator.
Explain the essence of the H-LAW?
The H-LAW is the only law we have at the Temple of Hip Hop which stands for Health, Love, Awareness and Wealth. To live in this state of mind uninterrupted is a state of being that we are now invoking and calling into existence within our com- munity. Health is beyond just the physical body. We are referring to a healthy mind, body, soul, community, state, temple and world eventually, God willing. Love is the essence of all existence and the bridge for the four elements of the H-LAW. Awareness, as in being aware of our surroundings; who we are and what our purpose is. Wealth is much more than just riches. A rich man with a lot of money can call himself wealthy, but end up being poor in conscience.
Most everything has a good and a bad, so what’s the best thing about being in your shoes?
It’s not knowing who, or what will show up next in my life. I wouldn’t say I live my life dangerously on the edge, but it’s the excitement and the newness of everyday life and not knowing what’ll happen next. Also, I’ve had the pleasure of watching the Hip Hop culture grow.
What’s one thing you’d improve upon personally, first and foremost?
It’s my confidence. All of us go through this when being real and honest to whom we say we are. It’s the confidence to go out and know that there’s something more to our existence than what we’ve been taught. When you take into account people’s inventions and the human’s creative mind, we really don’t know if there are any real limits to our civilization. Our knowledge is forever changing. I’m improving on my ability to communicate and speak from the heart better than I have before.
When you say, “We are truly here to become a whole new creation”, what’s the first step in doing so?
It’s seeing that I wanted a change in my life and not being afraid to go after it. We pray for things to happen in our lives, then they happen and we don’t know what to do half of the time. We have to learn how to humble ourselves. When you come to change yourself, ask yourself if you want to become a better version of your old self, or do you want to become a “whole new creation?”
To the readers out there, XS10 wants to know what you want to become. Your future is in your hands.
Article written: Bill Oxford

Life of a former Mob daughter

Nora Schweihs
“Determined to Re-define Her Family Name”
Growing up in a society where girls parade around in their youthful femininity, often times dating their newest, freshest puppy love; Nora Schweihs was under the watchful eyes of her loving father and older siblings which made her dat- ing prospects slim to none. That doesn’t mean Nora isn’t grown when handling herself amongst assertive men. She has a keen sense for street smarts and a motivation to accede all expectations others and even those she has placed upon herself. A friend of mine once reminded me; where there’s a will, there’s a way, and Nora Schweihs has developed herself into an entrepreneur to be reckoned with while creating a global brand name, “The German”. Enjoy her wine, sit back, read her autobiography, be intrigued by Nora’s amazing story and know that yes, you too can move forward into better days. Here’s a glimpse into Nora’s approach toward life and some of her aspirations which feed the fuel to her fire.
What was it like for you as a child?
I was born and raised in Riverside, IL. The reason I was approached for “Mob Wives Chicago” is because the creator Jenn Graziano of “Mob Wives New York”; our fathers were incarcerated together in the 90’s. As a child, my father had a jazz club that was pretty well known called “Club Nickel”. Artists like Nina Simone and Miles Davis played there. I always thought of my father as a businessman. Growing up in an upper scale neighborhood, it is what it is if you read the papers and articles, but I just saw him as being my dad. My dad was the best person in the world to me. I got everything I ever wanted. He was always there for me. No matter what anyone says about him being the most notorious hit man for the Chicago Outfit. I was with him during the last few years before he became a fugitive and supposedly died.
Why would you say that he “supposedly” died?
The day we went to bury him, the government confiscated his body out of the funeral home and said they hadn’t done an autopsy, but we already had a death certificate. That’s the last we knew, because he never showed up to the cemetery and we never saw him go into the ground. In the finale of “Mob Wives Chicago”, after 4 years I got a court order through the show in an effort to find out what exactly happened to my father. We ended up having his body exhumed, (Nora continues with an irritated tone) but of course once again, even though I had the court order they did not let me see the body out of the ground. By the time I got to the cemetery they ignored the court order and the body was already out of the ground. Then the pathologist came to me and said it wasn’t him. At that point I had to actually go in and see the medical records that came back inconclusive, and also the dental records. (With some doubts, Nora continues). “Mob Wives Chicago” was an opportunity for me to speak the truth to the world and use the show as a forum for the first time in my life, instead of people just being exposed to everything you hear in the media. I was one of the cast members for the show which unfortu- nately ended in July 2012. It was a spin-off of the New York show.
When you were younger, did you like the bad boys in school and in the neighborhood?
You know, when I was younger there wasn’t anybody who would talk to me on that level. (Nora begins to laugh as she looks back) With my brother and father around, I couldn’t even get a prom date. I recall as a young girl our house was raided and I had a birthday party with about 40 people scheduled and no one showed up. People would say stuff like, “Well, your dad’s a hoodlum! Now we can’t come!” Hearing about me actually getting a date was unheard of.
Did you ever fantasize about being affiliated, or married into the mob lifestyle?
I did end up marrying somebody who was involved in those affairs, but I was young at 22 and he was a lot older. He was Italian and I’m half-Greek, half-German. That’s why they called my father “The German”. That’s another reason why I didn’t have children with my ex. I knew how I felt growing up and didn’t want that life for my child.
What are the benefits of being in your shoes?
Growing up, wherever I went I was known, but I was always known as “The German’s daughter”. It was nice drinking wine, cognac and champagne. I went to the best schools while living in a great area. It was due to my dad and I never looked at him as anything other than Frank Schweihs, my dad. Other people looked at him in a different light.
Aside from the reality TV show “Mob Wives Chicago”, what would you be pursuing as a passion in life?
I do a lot when it comes to wine. I’ve created a new exquisite Pinot Noir called, “The German”. It’s in honor of my father. When everything happened with my father, I went back to school, earned my Associates in Criminal-Paralegal, worked for
a criminal attorney, then went on to get my Bachelors in Business only to graduate with a Master in Business Management. (With an optimistic tone) I’m hoping the wine will take off! I just moved to L.A. from Chicago with the intentions of starting a whole new life and moving forward with “The German” wine. I’m trying to get away from the stigma of my father being this “notorious hit-man”. My new book will be an interesting autobiography soon to be published by John Luciano (Lucky Luciano’s nephew) who signed my book deal. Now, I’m out West and this is a whole different world for me.
What are some of your favorite movies?
I love Denzel Washington movies. I also like the movie Taken. Along Came A Spider. My father and I would listen to jazz. I noticed he was this worldwide traveler and even though I grew up in Chicago, he taught me a lot of things the average kid my age didn’t know. It was a wonderful experience to have a father like mine.
Do you have any fear of your father’s past coming back to haunt you?
Everybody in life has a fear. I know I’m a woman, but I think and act like a guy. I try to move forward in life and I have a lot of really good people around me here in L.A. Do I wake up every day with that fear? Absolutely not! Trust me, because my dad was very well respected. I tell people that my dad never really died; he was reincarnated as me. I know. You’re speech- less, right? Hopefully with “The German” wine, I’ll have the success and respect similar to what he had nationwide.
What’s one thing on your bucket list?
For my next trip I would love to go to Spain. I’ve already traveled to Greece and Italy.
Any charities and/or business endeavors that you’d want to promote?
I’ve been involved in 5 events recently and helped to raise a lot of money from Susan G. Kohlmann events held in Chicago, New York and Palm Springs meant to help find a cure for cancer. That means a lot to me because both of my parents had cancer and fought it. I’ve had a few friends who had breast cancer and ever since the end of “Mob Wives Chicago” I’ve par- ticipated in a Cure for Cancer walk along with being heavily involved in the Susan G. Kohlmann drive/movement.
Other than just breathing and being alive, where do you want to be in life?
I’m just putting the past behind me and hoping maybe one day I’ll meet someone (a significant other) who respects me and we get along. I’ve spent the last four years focusing on school. I want to be known simply as Nora with my wine, autobiog- raphy, my involvement in working for a cure for cancer and for continuing in life as a driven entrepreneur.
Courtesy of: Reddoggmusic.com Article written by: Bill Oxford, 3-20-2013

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Jojo Capone views on The Fake Rick Ross dealing with the GD's

Here is JOJO CAPONE talking about the beef between the GD's &. Fake Rick Ross the rapper.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUqBQ0_xnaI&sns=em

How to Get your Music on Local Radio Stations

So, your first-ever CD is done and the release date is set. But unless you’ve already delivered copies of the disc to local radio stations, you may want to push back that date to give you enough time to ensure airplay goes along with the release. Radio stations are more apt to spotlight music that has an upcoming release date, so send them advance copies. No need to pay a promoter to get on your hometown’s stations — that could be a waste of money. Do a little research to figure out which stations might play your kind of music and what staff members to approach about possible airplay.

Public and college stations

Since you’re an indie act, public and college stations are your best bet for getting airplay. These stations are more likely to play a diverse range of music from local and lesser-known acts than commercial stations with corporate interests to uphold. Public stations have a lot of syndicated PBS national programming to run, but may have local programming slots they need to fill with music, generally folk, jazz and classical. Up-and-coming acts will find more success by approaching local college stations. These left-of-the-dial operations are staffed by students and usually play non-mainstream and newer music from unsigned acts. College radio is generally where new alternative and indie acts break into the market. Each station has a music programmer who selects the music that gets played in general rotation, or specialty DJs who select the tracks for genre-specific programs. Find out the contact info for the music programmer by calling the station’s general info/request line and asking for it. If your music will fit into a genre-specific program, call during that program and speak directly to the DJ, who is normally the one who answers the phone. Since these stations are operated by students, they are more amenable to cold calls about getting airplay and, in fact, are actively looking for undiscovered acts to play on their shows, no matter the genre. Once you get the correct contact info, mail your press kit and CD in with a personal note explaining which show you’re submitting for. Don’t forget to put your contact info on every page and piece of material your send in.

Commercial stations

If you’re just starting out and don’t have professional representation or a wide local following, contacting local commercial stations might not yield much luck…unless they have a locals-only or indie-specific specialty show. Commercial stations generally only deal with agents, promoters and A&R people, not directly with artists, and especially not with unknown artists. It’s the sad-but-true reality of today’s corporate commercial radio. However, many of these stations have shows spotlighting locals and the best unsigned acts. If your town’s commercial station has one of these shows, it usually airs outside of prime-time and drive-time, such as late on a Sunday night. Call the DJ during the show and ask for submission info.

When sending your CD in to any radio station, it’s important to include a note indicating which song is the most radio-friendly. If you do make it on one of these local programs, make sure your fans know about it so they can listen and call the station to tell them how much they liked it, and to request the song again. All radio stations — public and commercial — take note of this kind of listener feedback..